Mammút - Komdu til mín svarta systir
1 - Ströndin
2 - Blóðberg
3 - Til mín
4 - Salt
5 - Þau svæfa
6 - Ró
7 - Glæður
8 - Hvítserkur
9 - Tungan

Only a few months after forming, 5-piece rock outfit Mammút won the annual battle of the bands a.k.a. the Músiktilraunir competition in 2004. The three girls and two boys in Mammút had an average age of 15. Mammút’s eponymous debut album (Smekkleysa, 2006) and “Karkari” (Record Records, 2008) were the 2 previous records. It took the postpunk group 5 years to create a third album: “Komdu til mín svarta systir” (Come to me black sister). Singer Katrína’s neurotic, elastic and gymnastic voice has too often been compared with the vocal cords of Björk. On the contrary, this longplayer marks Kata’s quite unique and distinctive voice, with almost no cries, gasps, shrieks and tics like before. Guitarists Arnar & Alexandra play as tight as usual and the rhythm session is at full force.

Track nr. 1 “Ströndin” is a sort of windy walk on the beach, while being attacked by venomous Nordic terns. The guitars in song 2, “Blóðberg” (Blood Mountain), sound like in the early The Cure records, but it doesn’t run in the blood as Killing an Arab. The traditional mammuthus sound is not extincted, that becomes evident if you listen to “Til mín” (To me). Next one, “Salt”, is a beautifully build-up track with salt-n-pepa and obviously the highlight of the album. The song “Þau svæfa” (They put to sleep) puts you slowly asleep, but ends in a sudden death. Interlude “Ró” is indeed an oh so quiet intermezzo. Guitar-driven internal flame “Glæður” (Embers) and piano-driven waterfall “Hvítserkur” (White tunic) are the reinforced concrete fundaments for the apotheosis. The final song “Tungan” (Tongue) is the grande finale. The band visits the industrial lending library of master of noise Blixa Bargeld.

Mammút’s music has developed in to something less aggressive, but more mature. “Komdu til mín svarta systir” is an imminent, coherent, smouldering and subdued album, that strikes a different note. Without any doubt, it is the band’s pièce de résistance.

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